A Project of Brandl & Talos Law Firm

Honey for Charity is an initiative of the Brandl & Talos Law Firm as well as the Brandl Family. Together they share a passion: sustainable honey production.

10 Facts, That You Should Know

Learn more about the life of bees,
what they can do and why we desperately need them.

What Makes Our Honey So Unique

Resource-conserving honey production! It is also unique in that we donate the proceeds from sale – with the exception of VAT – to Caritas.

My Passion

Since 2009, my family in Krumau am Kamp (Waldviertel, Lower Austria) has been dedicated to sustainable and bee-friendly honey production. What started with three beehives in a barn of a renovated farmhouse, has since grown to an apiary of almost sixty colonies. Within the flight radius of our bees, we offer around 15 hectares (37 acres) of fields and meadows as well as 15 hectares of pristine forest for them to collect the nectar.

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The meadows and fields in the immediate flight radius of our bees are cultivated as biodiversity areas with plants that attract not only our honey bees but also many other insects which otherwise have difficulty finding enough food in the traditionally managed agriculture. A variety of “insect mixes” have been planted including Thistles, Phacelia and various varieties of Clover. Other plants, such as Cornflowers, Bugloss or wild Borretsch, which have been pushed back by weed-killers during the last decades, are re-conquering their old homeland. We are constantly working to eliminate the use of pesticides in the area of the Brandl bees completely.

From the very outset, in caring for our bees, we have strived to pursue innovative methods. We treat the beehives with heat (hyperthermia) against the Varroa mite, which, together with plant protection products (pesticides, herbicides etc), is the greatest threat to the honeybee. Contrary to the usual evaporation of formic acid or oxalic acid in the hive (which can be compared to an infusion of formic acid in the sauna), the bee brood in the Varroa controller is gently heated up to a temperature which is fatal for the Varroa offspring but harmless for the bee larvae. Together with strict honeycomb hygiene and a wide range of food sources in the immediate vicinity, this has led to strong, resistant colonies since the beginning of our activity, with no winter losses due to colony collapse disorder.

Honey Quality. Considering that bees – to save energy – always gravitate towards the nearest flowering, we can largely ensure that the collectors actually get nectar and pollen from unstressed and untreated plants and the honey is free from harmful chemical influences.

Environmental Protection. The areas in the flight radius of our bees are to be exempt from traditional agriculture and carefully treated. This means: no pesticides, no fertilization, bio-diverse planting, and providing a home for rare animals and flowers.

Bee Protection. No chemicals in the beehive, no evaporation of formic acid or oxalic acid in the hive, no pharmaceuticals, no pesticides in the honey or in the pollen stock of the bee population. Healthy living conditions for the most efficient pollinators to be found in nature.

Alternative Soil Utilization. It does not always have to be resource and pesticide-intensive corn or grain in monoculture. We want to know whether honey production could be an alternative to traditional land use – profitable agriculture with the greatest possible conservation of resources.

We would like to thank our neighbors Gerti and Walter Reiter for cultivating their and our meadows as large biodiversity areas and their fields with bee-friendly plants. We would like to thank Rudi Berger, the jack-of-all-trades, for facilitating the work with tailor-made technical designs and rapid intervention when something needs to be repaired. We thank Bruno and Paul Mayer for their help with removing conifers infected with bark-beetles and planting new broadleaves whose blossoms will soon give nectar and pollen. We also say thanks to Waldviertel’s greatest gardener, Hans Pernerstorfer, for planting bee-friendly trees, hedges and bushes, that not only provide for nectar and pollen but also look fantastic all year round. Last but not least, we would like to thank the mayor of Krumau, Franz Sinhuber, for valuable advice in the context of official procedures and his benevolent attitude towards our new beekeeping as well as all those in Krumau who have showed interest in our project.

Thank you for supporting Honey for Charity!

Dr. Ernst Brandl
Beekeeper

My Passion

Since 2009, my family in Krumau am Kamp (Waldviertel, Lower Austria) has been dedicated to sustainable and bee-friendly honey production. What started with three beehives in a barn of a renovated farmhouse, has since grown to an apiary of almost twenty colonies. Within the flight radius of our bees, we offer around 15 hectares (37 acres) of fields and meadows as well as 15 hectares of pristine forest for them to collect the nectar.

The meadows and fields in the immediate flight radius of our bees are cultivated as biodiversity areas with plants that attract not only our honey bees but also many other insects which otherwise have difficulty finding enough food in the traditionally managed agriculture. A variety of “insect mixes” have been planted including Thistles, Phacelia and various varieties of Clover. Other plants, such as Cornflowers, Bugloss or wild Borretsch, which have been pushed back by weed-killers during the last decades, are re-conquering their old homeland. Artificial fertilizers and plant protection products (i.e. pesticides, herbicides etc) are taboo in the world of the Brandl-Bees.

From the very outset, in caring for our bees, we have strived to pursue innovative methods. We treat the beehives with heat (hyperthermia) against the Varroa mite, which, together with plant protection products (pesticides, herbicides etc), is the greatest threat to the honeybee. Contrary to the usual evaporation of formic acid or oxalic acid in the hive (which can be compared to an infusion of formic acid in the sauna), the bee brood in the Varroa controller is gently heated up to a temperature which is fatal for the Varroa offspring but harmless for the bee larvae. Together with strict honeycomb hygiene and a wide range of food sources in the immediate vicinity, this has led to strong, resistant colonies since the beginning of our activity, with no winter losses due to colony collapse disorder.

Honey Quality. Considering that bees – to save energy – always gravitate towards the nearest flowering, we can largely ensure that the collectors actually get nectar and pollen from unstressed and untreated plants and the honey is free from harmful chemical influences.

Environmental Protection. The areas in the flight radius of our bees are to be exempt from traditional agriculture and carefully treated. This means: no pesticides, no fertilization, bio-diverse planting, and providing a home for rare animals and flowers.

Bee Protection. No chemicals in the beehive, no evaporation of formic acid or oxalic acid in the hive, no pharmaceuticals, no pesticides in the honey or in the pollen stock of the bee population. Healthy living conditions for the most efficient pollinators to be found in nature.

Alternative Soil Utilization. It does not always have to be resource and pesticide-intensive corn or grain in monoculture. We want to know whether honey production could be an alternative to traditional land use – profitable agriculture with the greatest possible conservation of resources.

We would like to thank our neighbors Gerti and Walter Reiter for cultivating their and our meadows as large biodiversity areas and their fields with bee-friendly plants. We would like to thank Rudi Berger, the jack-of-all-trades, for facilitating the work with tailor-made technical designs and rapid intervention when something needs to be repaired. We thank Bruno and Paul Mayer for their help with removing conifers infected with bark-beetles and planting new broadleaves whose blossoms will soon give nectar and pollen. We also say thanks to Waldviertel’s greatest gardener, Hans Pernerstorfer, for planting bee-friendly trees, hedges and bushes, that not only provide for nectar and pollen but also look fantastic all year round. Last but not least, we would like to thank the mayor of Krumau, Franz Sinhuber, for valuable advice in the context of official procedures and his benevolent attitude towards our new beekeeping as well as all those in Krumau who have showed interest in our project.

Thank you for supporting Honey for Charity!

Dr. Ernst Brandl
Beekeeper

Our Stars

Natural & Stirred

The Natural

The Natural

from EUR 10,00

To the Honey Shop
The Stirred

The Stirred

from EUR 10,00

To the Honey Shop

» Honey Knowledge «

10 Facts you should know …

» Honey Knowledge «

10 Facts you should know …